Meditating the Spindle Day 2

We had a wonderful second day of the Meditating the Spindle workshop.

The students had done their homework (lots of practice!) and came ready to learn how to ply their yarn and then how to finish it. After a break it was time to learn the very different technique of spinning silk, using silk hankies (including some gorgeous hand-dyed ones in lustrous colours).

Everyone did amazingly well and ended the workshop as very able and enthusiastic spinners, having made lots of yarn and ready to try new experiments incorporating all sorts of fibres and threads from embroidery floss to feathers and horsehair! Huge thanks to Giulia Mangoni for translation and teaching assistance!

As of Sunday 19 November, there are still a couple of places available in the next Meditating the Spindle Workshop, which will be held at Counterweave Arts Gallery & Workshop in Rome over the next two Saturday afternoons 25 November and 2 December 2-5pm.  Spindles, fibre and detailed class notes are provided: any previous experience with yarn or fibre will be helpful, but not necessary. Classes are in English with Italian translation.

You can book here or contact me at [email protected] for more details or if you would like private lessons.

We will be running regular workshops, including online classes, next year. As well as Meditating the Spindle, there will be classes on spinning with exotic fibres (including paper!), embroidery, silk papermaking, knitting, eco and indigo dyeing. We will be finalising the program over the next month with classes to start from the end of January – click here to sign up for the Counterweave newsletter for details and early bird discounts. And don’t forget we’re running a poll over on the Counterweave Facebook page to see what sort of workshops you would like to see next year. Click here to participate and get a 10% discount on 2018 workshop bookings!

art | craft | anima - Counterweave - Melbourne + Rome. Australian, Aboriginal & Asia-Pacific contemporary arts, crafts & textiles. Reiki & Tarot.

 

Meditating the Spindle Day 1

We had a great day on Saturday for the first Meditating the Spindle workshop. Keeping the group small makes for a cosier atmosphere and means I can give participants individual attention. Not that these students needed much attention! They picked it up so quickly and by the end of the afternoon everyone was spinning yarn.

Yoga mats meant that the inevitable dropped spindle wasn’t something to worry about, and short meditations kept the stress of learning a new skill down to a manageable level (no one swore, unlike me when I was learning) Chocolate helped too, of course…

Day 1 focused on getting to know the spindle and spinning lovely soft wool fibre from Hilltop Cloud. Day 2 is this Saturday and we’ll be learning to ply and exploring the possibilities of silk.

The next Meditating the Spindle workshop will be held on Saturday 25 November and Saturday 2 December – book here to reserve your place! If those dates don’t suit you I also take individual students – email me at [email protected]

And we’re running a poll over on the Counterweave Facebook page to see what sort of workshops you would like to see next year. Click here to participate and get a 10% discount on 2018 workshop bookings!

Meditating the Spindle workshops – book now!

We are now taking bookings for our Meditating the Spindle Workshops! Workshops are held on consecutive Saturday afternoons:

Saturday 4 & 11 November 2-5pm

OR

Saturday 25 November & 2 December 2-5pm

Spindles, fibre and class notes are provided. Any previous experience with yarn or fibre will be helpful, but not necessary

Min 2, max 6 students.

Cost: €120 incl IVA and materials

Click here to book your place!

 

Spinning fibre by hand using a drop spindle is an ancient technique and one the world relied on for thousands of years and it can teach us much about mindfulness in our very techno world in the 21st century. It is a skill that relies on patience, gentle concentration and mindful hands as well as a quiet mind.

This class will teach the fundamental skills required to use a drop spindle. By the end of the class participants will know and understand the use of the drop spindle; the different fibres that can be used to make different types of thread or yarn; be able to use their spindle to make yarn. They will learn how using a drop spindle can be an aid to mindfulness, meditation and calm.

Instructor: Felicity Griffin Clark has more than thirty years’ experience in fibre arts. She spins wool, silk, paper and hemp and makes textile and mixed media art. She is also a knitter and weaver. Felicity also takes private students for instruction, coaching or mentoring.

Contact: [email protected]

 

Exciting news!

We are really excited to announce that LM Residori-Knowles has joined Counterweave!

LM is a successful contemporary Australian artist of Aboriginal and European descent, currently living in France.

My art practice has been driven by ongoing personal desire to seek out traces of my heritage, and to construct an understanding of my identity and ‘place’ in Australia’s present day multicultural society. It has become an unremitting examination of the narratives and stories of Australia’s postcolonial histories, and the impact they have had on Indigenous culture today; in particular women such as myself.

LM’s unique textural collage paintings combine textiles, leather and paper with traditional Indigenous materials like fur and grass tree resin.  She has exhibited her work across Australia and Europe. Find out more about her here.

LM’s work will be available in the gallery from mid-November  email [email protected] for more information or to book a private gallery viewing.

We are very grateful to the Australian Cultural Centre – Italy who introduced LM Residori-Knowles to Counterweave and saw the possibilities and connections between our work. The Australian Cultural Centre – Italy provides support for Australians and Australian projects and programs in Italy, and works with local Italian Communities to create and develop projects and programs between Australia and Italy that offer long-term value to both of our countries. More information on the Australian Cultural Centre – Italy can be found here.

Seven Sisters Dreaming

 Justinna Napaljarri Sims ‘Yanjirlpirri or Napaljarri-Warnu Jukurrpa (Star or Seven Sisters Dreaming)

151x62cm acrylic on canvas €1854 (incl tax) click here for more information

 

An ancient story

The constellation of the Pleiades, or Seven Sisters, has been a potent symbol for artists, writers and storytellers for thousands of years.

The star cluster is mentioned in the Bible and the Koran and was important in Greek, Celtic and Norse mythology.  The seven brightest stars of the Pleiades have been the focus for stories, myths and rituals for many First Peoples and is an important dreaming story for Aboriginal peoples across Australia.  ‘Dreaming’ is an entirely inadequate term for incredibly complex systems of recording, holding and passing on cultural knowledge and laws encompassing every aspect of life from creation, ethics, morality, kinship, medicine, food, seasons and water, all mapped onto landscape, watercourses and sky. The complex kinship system and how it relates to animals, birds, landscape and skies determines which individuals and families are entitled to tell which particular Dreamings.

Counterweave currently has an example of the Seven Sisters Dreaming, by Warlukurlangu artist Justinna Napaljarri Sims.  Warlukurlangu artists depict the Pleaides as the Napaljarri -Warnu Jukurrpa or Seven Sisters Dreaming.

The sisters are seven women of the Napaljarri skin group and are often depicted in paintings of this Jukurrpa carrying the Jampijinpa man ‘wardilyka’ (the bush turkey) who is in love with the Napaljarri -warnu and who represents the Orion’s Belt cluster of stars.  Jukurra-jukurra, the morning star, is a Jakamarra man who is also in love with the seven  sisters and is often shown chasing them across the night sky.

In a final attempt to escape  the women turned themselves into fire and ascended to the heavens to become stars.

The custodians of the Napaljarri-warnu Jukurrpa are Japaljarri/Jungarrayi men and Napaljarri/Nungarrayi women. Some parts of the Napaljarri-warnu Jukurrpa are closely associated with men’s sacred ceremonies of a very secretive nature. Yanjirlpirri Jukurrpa (Star Dreaming) tells of the journey of Japaljarri and Jungarrayi men who travelled west to Lake Mackay on the Western Australian border. Along the way, they performed ‘ kurdiji’ (initiation ceremonies) for young men. Women also danced for the ‘kurdiji’.

The site depicted in this canvas is Yanjirlypiri (star) where there is a low hill and a water soakage.

The importance of this place cannot be overemphasized as young boys are brought hundreds of kilometres to be initiated, from as far as Pitjanjatjara country to the south and Lajamanu to the north. In contemporary Warlpiri paintings traditional iconography is used to represent the Jukurrpa, associated sites and other elements. Often depicted in paintings for this Jukurrpa is the female star Yantarlarang (Venus – the Evening Star) who chases the seven Napaljarri sisters for having stolen the night from her.

The artist

Justinna Napaljarri Sims was born in 1977 in the Alice Springs Hospital, the closest hospital to Yuendumu, a remote Aboriginal community 290 km north-west from Alice Springs and the location of the Warlukurlangu Artists Aboriginal Corporation. She went to school at Yirrara college in Alice Springs, but returned to the community in 1999 where she has lived permanently ever since. She is married to Gordon Jangala Robertson and has two daughters, Vicky and Chantal. Apart from being a mother and painter, Justinna also works part time in a local store in Yuendumu.

Justinna is the grand-daughter of Paddy Japaljarri Sims (dec), one of the founding artists of Warlukurlangu. She has been painting with Warlukurlangu since 1999, however it wasn’t until 2010 that she has had time to paint consistently. She paints many of her grandfather’s Jukurrpa stories, Dreamings, which include Ngarlkirdi Jukurrpa (Witchetty Grub Dreaming) and Yanjirlpirri Jukurrpa (Star Dreaming), Dreamings which relate directly to her land, its features and animals.

Further reading

Deepening Histories of Place, edited by Mary Anne Jebb and Ann McGrath, Australian National Universality Press 2015 downloadable here http://press.anu.edu.au/publications/aboriginal-history-monographs/long-history-deep-time

The Oxford Companion to Aboriginal Art and Culture general editors Sylvia Kleinert and Margo Neal, Cultural Editor Robyne Bancroft OUP 2008

Friday Essay: land, kinship and ownership of ‘Dreamings’ March 17, 2016, Christine Nicholls, Senior Lecturer in Australian Studies, Flinders University, https://theconversation.com/friday-essay-land-kinship-and-ownership-of-dreamings-39637

 

strong in culture

Counterweave Arts is more than selling Aboriginal art – we believe sharing aspects of Aboriginal culture is a fundamental part of being an ethical fair trade business. Aboriginal artists choose to share stories and knowledge through their paintings: these artworks are not just beautiful objects, they share some of the intricate cosmology, social structures, botany, medicine and spirituality that runs through every aspect of life. They are full of significance and meaning.

Agnes Nampijinpa Brown Ngapa Jukurrpa (Water Dreaming) – Puyurru

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have lived in what we now call Australia for at least 60,000 years. Aboriginal culture is the longest continuing culture in the world and it continues to live and grow,  handed down through the generations through ceremony, lore, song, art and language. For Aboriginal people culture and connection to country are fundamental to identity: being strong in culture means knowing who you are, where you fit, where you belong. And language is key to this. More than 250 Indigenous Australian language groups were spoken at the time of colonisation in the late 18th-century. Around 120 are still spoken today but there is a great deal of work happening around the country to revive, preserve, and strengthen language. More information is available at the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies https://aiatsis.gov.au/

Currently Counterweave stocks artworks from Artists of Ampilatwatja and Warlukurlangu Artists Aboriginal Corporation. These are communities in the very centre of Australia – about 300 kilometres east (Ampilatwatja) and west (Warlukurlangu) of Alice Springs and for many of the artists English may be their fourth or fifth language.

Margaret Kemarre Ross of Artists of Ampilatwatja

Maria Nampijinpa Brown of Warlukurlangu Artists Aboriginal Corporation

In other parts of Australia English is the dominant language and Aboriginal languages have disappeared or are spoken by very few people. This is especially true in the south east of Australia where colonisation almost wiped out the local Aboriginal peoples, in spite of a strong resistance. Gunai/Kurnai country is not far from our home city of Melbourne: local elders have been working hard to revive and share the Gunai/Kurnai language and in doing so, preserve and hand on the unique Gunai/Kurnai culture.

‘Language isn’t just about speaking, it’s your whole way of life,’ explained Lynnette Solomon-Dent. ‘It tells you what’s in the country, what the stories are, what your obligations are to each other.’ Unpack a single word and you can start to understand a system of kin relations and cultural obligations that are still alive and well. The word for ‘mother’ doubles as the word used for Lynnette’s sisters. If anything happened to Lynnette, her sisters would automatically become mothers to her children. It’s all there in the language.

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  • note that we use the term “Aboriginal people” to include Torres Strait Islander people. This is not meant disrespectfully but to avoid repetition. For brevity and readability we use the term, “Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples” at the beginning of a written piece, and “Aboriginal people” thereafter.

Australian art in Rome in August and autumn classes

art | craft | anima - Counterweave - Melbourne + Rome. Australian, Aboriginal & Asia-Pacific contemporary arts, crafts & textiles. Reiki & Tarot.
Felicity Griffin Clark – mixed media indigo concertina art book

Australian art specialists in Rome, Counterweave Arts Gallery & Workshop is open throughout the summer.

August in Rome is traditionally when businesses close for the summer holiday. It’s true Rome is hot, people are saying ‘see you in September’ and there are signs going up on shop doors saying ‘chiuso per ferie’. But Counterweave Arts is open for business! If you want a cool place to revive, and see some beautiful artwork by Australian artists email us at [email protected] to arrange an appointment. Currently in the gallery we have works on canvas by Central Australian Aboriginal artists represented by Artists of Ampilatwatja and Warlukurlangu Artists Aboriginal Corporation, etchings by Melbourne artists, Lisa Sewards and Trudy Rice, and mixed media and textiles by Felicity Griffin Clark. Click here to see full catalogues of our current stock.

 

Nathania Nangala Granites, Warlukurlangu Jukurrpa (Fire country Dreaming)

 

Lisa Sewards Love is in the air

 

We also have some amazing wearable art in stock, with beautiful handwoven necklaces by Mary Burgess, silk scarves featuring the unique designs of Artists of Ampilatwatja and indigo silk scarves by Felicity Griffin Clark. These are also available in the online shop here.

We are currently working on our autumn/winter 2017 Counterweave Workshop program, with classes including:

  • Introduction to eco and indigo dyeing (one day workshop)

  • Introduction to shibori (one day workshop)

  • Meditating the Spindle – an introduction to mindful spinning (three half-day workshops)

Workshops will include materials, class notes and snacks, for a maximum of six participants, and led by Felicity Griffin Clark, an experienced mixed media and textile artist.  Dyeing and shibori workshops will use a range of natural materials including silk, wool, cotton and paper. Meditating the Spindle will focus on using wool and silk fibres. One to one classes for individual students are also available.

For more information email [email protected] or subscribe to the Counterweave newsletter for updates on exhibitions, opening nights, workshops and early bird discounts. A full autumn program and online booking will be available soon.