Featured artist – Trudy Rice

Featured artist – Trudy Rice

Trudy Rice Black Cockatoo & Hakea II-1

We are delighted to introduce our featured artist for June – Trudy Rice. Trudy is an Australian printmaker currently living and working in Melbourne, Australia. Trudy works mainly in solar plate etching, a form of etching that has minimal impact on the environment and produces spectacular results. You can see more of Trudy’s work in her Counterweave catalogue.

Much of her inspiration is collected quite close to home, from her garden and around the coastal landscape of Lorne on Victoria’s picturesque Great Ocean Road. Her studio is filled with specimens collected from the bush and sea. Clear air, gorgeous skies, beach and bush provide a never-ending palette to draw from.

Trudy has work in the collection of the Olivia Newton John Cancer & Wellness Centre at the Austin Hospital and other various Private Collections throughout Australia & UK. You can also buy her artwork on a range of homewares, from cushions to table runners and wallpaper through the Trudy Rice Collection. Her latest project is a commission for 8 metre artwork for an apartment lobby which is being refurbished.  The theme for the artwork is ‘bringing the outdoor gardens inside’, with a little Japanese inspiration from the bamboo in the garden.

Trudy Rice sketch

 

Trudy Rice – Red dragonfly with 4 seed pods & green cotton lavender-1

Trudy’s teaching includes workshops on linocut printing, solar plate etching and gelli-plate printing. She also gives regular live printing demonstrations. Trudy has managed and curated exhibitions since 2009 and is Curator & Convenor for Albert Park Secondary College Art Show often raising over $25,000 each year for this Creative Public School.

Trudy Rice Blue Pincushion Protea in the garden-1

www.trudyrice.com

Featured artists profile – Warlukurlangu Artists Aboriginal Corporation

Our featured artists for May are from the Warlukurlangu community in Central Australia. Warlukurlangu Artists Aboriginal Corporation is a community owned and run organisation representing artists from the remote desert Warlpiri communities of Yuendumu, Nyirripi and Yuelumu, which are located in the centre of Australia, 290km northwest of Alice Springs.

Warlukurlangu’s aim is to share and promote Warlpiri culture, to promote greater understanding of Aboriginal culture and to support local community projects  such as the Yuendumu Community Swimming Pool, the Kurdu Kurdukurlangu Childcare Centre and a scholarship fund supporting Aboriginal students studying medical and health related degrees at the University of New South Wales.

Joy Nangala Brown

Warlukurlangu is one of the oldest and most successful Aboriginal community-owned art centres in Australia. It has been owned and run by the Warlpiri and Anmatyerre people of the Yuendumu community since 1985. Works by Warlukurlangu artists are held in galleries and private collections around the world.

Ursula Napangardi Hudson

Warlukurlangu artists’ paintings act as ‘Dreaming tracks’ or maps and explain where and how features such as mountains, rocks and water sources/soaks were created. The paintings reflect and interpret the landscape (including the sky), birds, animals, plants and rocks – all full of significance and cultural meaning. Landscape features such as mountain ranges, valleys, soakages and rivers are seen as the result of ancient events and battles.Justinna Napaljarri Sims

These paintings do not reveal secret knowledge: they  share a certain level of knowledge that anyone is allowed to have access to. In keeping with Aboriginal laws, the artists reveal only a small amount of knowledge to the uninitiated. Artists talk of two broad levels of interpretation, the “inside” stories which are restricted to those of the appropriate ritual standing, and the “outside” stories which are open to all. Painting is an important way of passing on knowledge from Elders to the younger generations. Before Western paints and materials were introduced in the 1970s, Aboriginal people would draw in the dust, make petroglyphs and use ochre to decorate their bodies, tools and rock formations such as caves (rock art).

Alice Nampijinpa Michaels

To see more of these incredible artworks by Warlukurlangu artists, go to the Warlukurlangu catalogue or contact us if you are in Rome to visit the gallery. Keep an eye on our Facebook and Instagram feeds as we feature more artists throughout May.

[Information used with kind permission of the Warlukurlangu Aboriginal Artists Corporation. Copyright of all artwork and text remains with the artists and Aboriginal traditional owners and is administered on their behalf by Warlukurlangu Artists Aboriginal Corporation.]

Featured artist profile – Mary Burgess

Silk neckpiece

We are delighted to feature Australian artist Mary Burgess during April.  Mary is a hand weaver based in Melbourne, Australia. We were very proud to stage Mary’s exhibition ‘Weaving Meaning’ here in Rome in July 2017, which featured some of the works from her Woven Memories project.

Mother Rug, part of the Weaving Meaning exhibition, Rome, July 2017.

As part of Woven Memories, Mary works with people who have kept precious clothes, fabric, scarves and buttons, often when a family member has died. Collaborating with individuals and family groups she takes apart and then re-works their loved items through the medium of hand weaving. Mary creates unique keepsake pieces such as baby blankets, bedspreads, throw rugs and scarves. These new pieces nurture and comfort and continue to hold memories of loved family members and special times.

Woven Memory project in progress

We have a number of Mary’s incredible pieces of wearable art in the Counterweave collection. As well as necklaces made from vintage Lyon silk, we have some of Mary’s very special talisman pouches, woven from eco-dyed silk and often incorporating found objects like parrot feathers and special sticks from Mary’s travels through Central Australia. You can buy Mary’s pieces through the Counterweave Arts online shop or contact us if you are in Rome to visit the gallery.

Talisman pouches

Australian hand weaver Mary Burgess in her Melbourne studio

 

Featured artist – Lisa Sewards

This year we will be doing monthly profiles on all our artists. Our featured artist for March is Australian printmaker Lisa Sewards.

Lisa uses traditional printmaking techniques including etching, drypoint, aquatint, and engraving. She also explores the potential of solar plate etching. We have a number of Lisa’s etchings in our catalogue. You can see them online or make an appointment to see them in our Rome gallery.

Lisa Sewards Little Parachute Pigeon

Lisa’s work combines delicacy of touch with strong imagery and a limited palette. Her iconography reflects a preoccupation with memory, identity and loss stemming from her family’s experiences in World War 2. Parachutes, carrier pigeons and water are all recurring motifs, loaded with emotional significance.

Lisa Sewards Love is in the air

Lisa has been represented in major exhibitions around Australia, including solo exhibitions at the Port Jackson Press and fortyfivedownstairs galleries in Melbourne.  In 2018 she was a finalist in the Collins Place Gallery Summer Salon Art Prize and the 45th Muswellbrook Art Prize
Works on Paper Section

Lisa Sewards Chaos-3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exciting news!

We are really excited to announce that LM Knowles has joined Counterweave!

LM is a successful contemporary Australian artist of Aboriginal and European descent, currently living in France.

My art practice has been driven by ongoing personal desire to seek out traces of my heritage, and to construct an understanding of my identity and ‘place’ in Australia’s present day multicultural society. It has become an unremitting examination of the narratives and stories of Australia’s postcolonial histories, and the impact they have had on Indigenous culture today; in particular women such as myself.

LM’s unique textural collage paintings combine textiles, leather and paper with traditional Indigenous materials like fur and grass tree resin.  She has exhibited her work across Australia and Europe. Find out more about her here.

LM’s work will be available in the gallery from mid-November  email [email protected] for more information or to book a private gallery viewing.

We are very grateful to the Australian Cultural Centre – Italy who introduced LM Knowles to Counterweave and saw the possibilities and connections between our work. The Australian Cultural Centre – Italy provides support for Australians and Australian projects and programs in Italy, and works with local Italian Communities to create and develop projects and programs between Australia and Italy that offer long-term value to both of our countries. More information on the Australian Cultural Centre – Italy can be found here.

Seven Sisters Dreaming

 Justinna Napaljarri Sims ‘Yanjirlpirri or Napaljarri-Warnu Jukurrpa (Star or Seven Sisters Dreaming)

151x62cm acrylic on canvas €1854 (incl tax) click here for more information

 

An ancient story

The constellation of the Pleiades, or Seven Sisters, has been a potent symbol for artists, writers and storytellers for thousands of years.

The star cluster is mentioned in the Bible and the Koran and was important in Greek, Celtic and Norse mythology.  The seven brightest stars of the Pleiades have been the focus for stories, myths and rituals for many First Peoples and is an important dreaming story for Aboriginal peoples across Australia.  ‘Dreaming’ is an entirely inadequate term for incredibly complex systems of recording, holding and passing on cultural knowledge and laws encompassing every aspect of life from creation, ethics, morality, kinship, medicine, food, seasons and water, all mapped onto landscape, watercourses and sky. The complex kinship system and how it relates to animals, birds, landscape and skies determines which individuals and families are entitled to tell which particular Dreamings.

Counterweave currently has an example of the Seven Sisters Dreaming, by Warlukurlangu artist Justinna Napaljarri Sims.  Warlukurlangu artists depict the Pleaides as the Napaljarri -Warnu Jukurrpa or Seven Sisters Dreaming.

The sisters are seven women of the Napaljarri skin group and are often depicted in paintings of this Jukurrpa carrying the Jampijinpa man ‘wardilyka’ (the bush turkey) who is in love with the Napaljarri -warnu and who represents the Orion’s Belt cluster of stars.  Jukurra-jukurra, the morning star, is a Jakamarra man who is also in love with the seven  sisters and is often shown chasing them across the night sky.

In a final attempt to escape  the women turned themselves into fire and ascended to the heavens to become stars.

The custodians of the Napaljarri-warnu Jukurrpa are Japaljarri/Jungarrayi men and Napaljarri/Nungarrayi women. Some parts of the Napaljarri-warnu Jukurrpa are closely associated with men’s sacred ceremonies of a very secretive nature. Yanjirlpirri Jukurrpa (Star Dreaming) tells of the journey of Japaljarri and Jungarrayi men who travelled west to Lake Mackay on the Western Australian border. Along the way, they performed ‘ kurdiji’ (initiation ceremonies) for young men. Women also danced for the ‘kurdiji’.

The site depicted in this canvas is Yanjirlypiri (star) where there is a low hill and a water soakage.

The importance of this place cannot be overemphasized as young boys are brought hundreds of kilometres to be initiated, from as far as Pitjanjatjara country to the south and Lajamanu to the north. In contemporary Warlpiri paintings traditional iconography is used to represent the Jukurrpa, associated sites and other elements. Often depicted in paintings for this Jukurrpa is the female star Yantarlarang (Venus – the Evening Star) who chases the seven Napaljarri sisters for having stolen the night from her.

The artist

Justinna Napaljarri Sims was born in 1977 in the Alice Springs Hospital, the closest hospital to Yuendumu, a remote Aboriginal community 290 km north-west from Alice Springs and the location of the Warlukurlangu Artists Aboriginal Corporation. She went to school at Yirrara college in Alice Springs, but returned to the community in 1999 where she has lived permanently ever since. She is married to Gordon Jangala Robertson and has two daughters, Vicky and Chantal. Apart from being a mother and painter, Justinna also works part time in a local store in Yuendumu.

Justinna is the grand-daughter of Paddy Japaljarri Sims (dec), one of the founding artists of Warlukurlangu. She has been painting with Warlukurlangu since 1999, however it wasn’t until 2010 that she has had time to paint consistently. She paints many of her grandfather’s Jukurrpa stories, Dreamings, which include Ngarlkirdi Jukurrpa (Witchetty Grub Dreaming) and Yanjirlpirri Jukurrpa (Star Dreaming), Dreamings which relate directly to her land, its features and animals.

Further reading

Deepening Histories of Place, edited by Mary Anne Jebb and Ann McGrath, Australian National Universality Press 2015 downloadable here http://press.anu.edu.au/publications/aboriginal-history-monographs/long-history-deep-time

The Oxford Companion to Aboriginal Art and Culture general editors Sylvia Kleinert and Margo Neal, Cultural Editor Robyne Bancroft OUP 2008

Friday Essay: land, kinship and ownership of ‘Dreamings’ March 17, 2016, Christine Nicholls, Senior Lecturer in Australian Studies, Flinders University, https://theconversation.com/friday-essay-land-kinship-and-ownership-of-dreamings-39637

 

Mary Burgess Il significativo della tessitura

Mary Burgess: Il significato della tessitura

20 luglio al 28 luglio

Counterweave Arte, Via Tor De’ Conti, 22, Roma

“La tessitura diventa una reliquia dell’atto che si materializza, quando qualcosa di tangibile viene lanciata giù nel mondo, dando forma a qualcosa che si sarebbe stata sentita, sepolta dentro, è magari pure persa.” Mary Ma

 I tessuti di famiglia – i maglioni, i vestiti, i cappotti, gli accappatoi, le sciarpe, le cravatte, le coperte e più rimango silenziosi in tanti cassetti, armadi e garage. Non le vogliamo perdere ma non sappiamo che cosa farne. A volte, le buttiamo via velocemente ma con riluttanza quando facciamo la pulizia di primavera o quando un familiare muore.

Le opere qui sono tutte risposte al tentativo di tenere sospeso il filo, sia letteralmente che metaforicamente. I tessili e l’abbigliamento sono stati rilavorati attraverso il mezzo della tessitura a mano. In tutti i casi, la lavorazione coinvolgeva la decisione di usare i tessili del passato per creare qualcosa per il futuro.

Ogni capo è emerso attraverso la distruzione: strappare, lacerare e tagliare, scucire o dipanare i tessuti e l’abbigliamento. Spesso, quest’esperienza sembra rivivere la perdita dolorosa. Il processo coinvolge la rêverie, il racconto delle storie familiari, la comparsa delle verità conosciute ma impensate e la reinterpretazione dei rapporti. La tessitura sia delle storie che dei tessuti crea un oggetto tangibile dove il passato e il futuro diventano una matrice nuova, che tiene strati di significato pubblici e privati.

Questo è un processo sottile, che spesso non si può descrivere. C’è pure un senso che il capo nuovo non collega soltanto il passato con il futuro, ma sviluppa anche una vita e una storia propria.

Mary Burgess

“Tutto che creo è un tentativo a tessere una connessione con il mondo: lo sto sempre tessendo perché una volta è rotta.” Anais Nin

Mary è una tessitrice a mano da Melbourne, Australia. Si focalizza sulla memoria ed i tessili. Attraverso la propria esperienza di perdere il suo partner, ha sviluppato interesse nel modo in cui il dolore può diventare un po’ più sopportabile, magari trasformato dal processo di portare l’abbagliamento ed i tessili vecchi della famiglia e usarli per tessere una ‘memory cloth’ per il futuro. Mary ha scoperto che, attraverso il processo di tessere con le strisce strappate di tessuti che significano una cosa importante, qualcosa di nuova può anche essere tessuta dentro di noi.

Lavora con la gente che cerca a creare qualcosa originale che dura, dal vecchio ma prezioso abbigliamento di famiglia. Il suo processo creativo coinvolge ascoltare le storie di famiglia, disegnando in collaborazione con ogni cliente e usando i lori pezzi per tessere quello che si vuole: forse una coperta, una sciarpa, una borsa, una collana, oppure una decorazione per le pareti. Mary utilizza un originale telaio a terra a 4 licci molto bello ed un numero di telai da tavolo, a seconda il progetto. Lavora dal suo studio nel centro di Melbourne nel Nicholas Building, un edificio in stile Art-Déco che ospita tante piccole gallerie, gli artisti, gli architetti, le modiste, le gioielliere e le librerie. https://wovenmemories.com.au

L’abito di Delft

 In memoria di mia madre olandese ed il suo accappatoio blu che abbiamo comprato a Rotterdam.

“Non mi ricordo di mia madre, solo quando mando i miei occhi dalla finestra di mia camera da letto, nel blu del cielo distante, mi sento sulla mia faccia la quiete dello suo sguardo che si è diffusa attraverso il cielo intero.” Rabindranathe Tagore

Il tappetto di nonno per la bambina Ruby

Ogni volta che la madre di Ruby avvolge sua figliola in questo tappetto, si sente la forza, l’amore e la gentilezza di suo padre che racchiude la piccola, tenendola sicura ed aiutandola a crescere

La sciarpa in onore di Nina

Nina era un cocker spaniel splendida e giocosa. Adorava la sua coda piumosa, le orecchie lunghe e pelose e la sua famiglia. Questa è una memoria del suo calore, esuberante e tenero – un ricordo del suo spirito generoso.

Come mi amavi

Questo piccolo libro è una specie di narrativo, tracciando una storia d’amore. Comincia con gli inizi attraverso una grande gioia, poi la sofferenza e gli ultimi momenti del proprio partner. Utilizzando gli scampoli di vestiti, lenzuola e stoffa delle sedie, ogni piccolo tessile cucito o intessuto è una risposta alla memoria, una specie di rêverie tattile.

La copertina

La morbida mohair verde è inaspettatamente calda ed i tessuti strappati sono soffici dall’uso ed ai lavaggi. Il significato vero comunque viene dal atto di avvolgersi nei vestiti e tessuti d’un partner mancato tanto. Ogni filato ed ogni striscia strappata contiene le memorie d’un uomo di grande forza e generosità in un corpo cosi fragile – le sue qualità sono tessute insieme per proteggerla dal dolore di averlo perso.

Tappetto madre

Come si fa a rimanere aggrappato alle memorie dell’amore, le capacità e la cura d’una madre che esprimeva quelle qualità tramite l’arte di fare vestiti? Quando morì, i suoi tessuti, conservati cosi attentamente, rimanevano non usati per tanto tempo. Adesso che sono strappati a pezzi per tessere a mano, tengono le memorie di sua figlia molto sicure e, in più, la tengono caldo.

Ti tengo nel posto più sicuro che conosco

“La speranza è una cosa con le piume, che si posa nell’anima, e canta la melodia senza parole, e non si ferma – mai.” Emily Dickinson

Dentro ogni sacchetto, c’è un tesoro piccolo, qualcosa preziosa che tiene una memoria – un frammento di tessuto, un bottone, un grano, una chiave, un pezzettino di scrittura. Tenuta vicina al cuore, ogni pezzo porta una forza sorprendente e misteriosa.

Ma il dolore non finisce mai?

… non c’è un’altra parte, non c’è spingersi, c’è soltanto l’assorbimento, l’adattamento, e la rassegnazione. E dolore non è qualcosa che si può finire; anzi, si subisce. Il dolore diventa un elemento di sé stesso, un’alterazione del essere, un nuovo modo di vedere, una nuova definizione di sé.

[Translation from the original English by Natasha Kingston, Natasha Kingston Translations]

 

 

New exhibition: Mary Burgess, Weaving Meaning

Counterweave’s next exhibition opens next Thursday 22 July at 6.30pm at Via Tor De’ Conti, 22, Rome: ‘Mary Burgess, Weaving Meaning’ features works from the Woven Memories Collection. Mary is a hand-weaver who lives in Melbourne, Australia -she works with people who have kept precious clothes, fabric, scarves and buttons, often when a family member has died. Collaborating with individuals and family groups she takes apart and then re-works their loved items through the medium of hand weaving. Mary creates unique keepsake pieces such as baby blankets, bedspreads, throw rugs and scarves. These new pieces nurture and comfort and continue to hold memories of loved family members and special times.

The exhibition also documents the process of making the pieces through Mary’s project notebooks and the threads and ‘yarn’ made from the person’s clothing.

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As well as these precious objects, Mary has created some very special pieces of wearable art for Counterweave – these will be for sale at the gallery and through the website (stay tuned for more details).

Exhibition opening night!

Counterweave Arts Gallery & Workshop had a very successful exhibition opening on Tuesday evening.

The artworks by Trudy Rice, Lisa Sewards, Artist of Ampilatwatja and Warlukurlangu Artists Aboriginal Corporation just glowed on the walls! In spite of the very warm and humid weather we had a steady stream of visitors who  were really captivated by the different responses to landscape by Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal artists, and admired the variety of techniques and media used by the artists.

Counterweave is open by appointment – just contact us at [email protected] or through the Counterweave Facebook page to make a time! Free pdf catalogues and price lists are also available.

Warlukurlangu artist – Walter Jangala Brown

Walter Jangala Brown was born in 1977 in Yuendumu, a remote Aboriginal community 290 km north-west of Alice Springs in the Northern Territory of Australia. He comes from a long line of artists including Pintupi artist Ronnie Jampijinpa, a highly acclaimed painter and founder of the Papunya Tula Artists group. Walter went to Yirara College, an Aboriginal boarding college in Alice Springs. When he finished school, he worked for the Shire for 2 or 3 years. He now lives in Nyirripi and is married to Valerie. They have three children.

He began painting for Warlukurlangu Artists Aboriginal Corporation, an Aboriginal owned and governed art centre located in Yuendumu in 2007. He paints his father’s Ngapa Jukurrpa (Water Dreaming); Warna Jukurrpa (Snake Dreaming); and Yumari Jukurrpa (a collection of rocks located to the west of Kintore in the Gibson Desert). He also paints his grandfather’s Tingari Cycle. These dreamings relate directly to his land, its features and the plants and animals that inhabit it.

When Walter is not working or painting he plays football and goes hunting.

Walter Jangala Brown, Tingari Cycle (122 x 107 cm) acrylic on canvas POA

This painting depicts a portion of the Tingari cycle, a very important collection of Dreaming narratives from the Western Desert region . The country that this painting depicts is located far to the west of Yuendumu, and spans a vast area of land across the Gibson and Great Sandy Deserts in Western Australia . Aboriginal groups that paint the Tingari cycle include the Pintupi, Kukatja, Ngarti, and Walmajarri peoples, among others. The Tingari cycle consists of three major Dreaming tracks.The cycle tells the story of a group of ancient creation ancestors, the Tingari, who travelled across the country .The Tingari took different forms, some human and some animal. Humans were typically initiated men accompanied by ‘punyunyu’ (novices, uninitiated men). The men were sometimes accompanied by extremely powerful initiated women (called variously the ‘Kungka Tjuta,’ ‘Minyma Tjuta, ‘or ‘Kanaputa’) . Like the initiated men, these initiated women were accompanied by uninitiated women to whom they provided a ritual education. Animals featured in the Tingari cycle include the dingo, emu, kingfisher, and western quoll, among others .

As the Tingari travelled over vast areas of the country, they held initiations and other ceremonies, caused or encountered raging bushfires, hunted game, found and cooked bush-tucker, fought and killed one another, disposed of the dead or brought them back to life, interacted with totemic ancestors, copulated illicitly , made and used sacred objects, flew through the air, and died in hailstorms . In the course of these adventures, they either created or became the physical features of the sites they visited, forming rocky outcrops, waterholes , trees, salt lakes, ochre deposits, and so on. These sites which are now regarded as sacred by their descendants, today’s custodians of these places.

The Tingari also laid down social customs n law as it should be practised today. Their journeys form the basis of sacred and secret men’s and women’s laws. Public paintings of th Tingari cycle typically only show the unrestricted portions of these stories.

Traditional iconography is used to represent the Dreamings, associated sites, and other elements of the Tingari cycle. In many paintings of these narratives, ancient wells, and other water features. Lines indicate rainfall and grasses that produced edible seeds after the rain, or routes taken by the Tingari as they travelled. People are represented by semi-circles. Sets of circles can represent the body-designs of the older men who are painting the bodies of the younger men, often as smaller circles.

 

[Information used with kind permission from  the Warlukurlangu Aboriginal Artists Corporation. Copyright of all artwork and text remains with the artists and Aboriginal traditional owners and is administered on their behalf by Warlukurlangu Artists Aboriginal Corporation.]

 

 

Two Australian Printmakers – Lisa Sewards and Trudy Rice

Counterweave’s opening exhibition features the work of Trudy Rice and Lisa Sewards – two well-established Australian printmakers renowned for their strength and delicacy of their work. The works in this exhibition are solar plate etchings printed on BFK Rives paper BFK Rives 280gsm, and sold unframed. Email us at [email protected] for a full catalogue and prices.

 

Lisa Sewards, Pigeon Wing II ( plate 30×20.5cm, paper 50x33cm) POA

 

Lisa Sewards, Love is in the air (plate 10.5cm diameter, paper 26x21cm) POA

 

Trudy Rice, Black Cockatoo & Hakea II (38 x 28.5 cm) POA

 

Trudy Rice, Blue Pincushion Protea in the garden
( 76 x 28.5 cm) POA

Ampilatwatja artist – Natasha Beasley

Natasha Beasley was born in 1972 in Ampilatwatja, an Aboriginal community in the Northern Territory of Australia. Natasha enjoys painting with her sister Traphina Beasley and says ” I find that painting makes me feel good I want to continue painting. My kids like to paint too”.

Natasha Beasley, View Of Country (46 x 46cm) POA

The community of Ampilatwatja made a conscious decision not to paint ‘altyerr’ dreaming stories, the artists paint their country where those stories sit. This painting shows the layered landscape of Alyawarr, Central Australia. Knowing your country is an important part of living in a remote community like Ampilatwatja. Knowing when and where to go hunting and gathering, knowing where there is ‘soakage’ (where you can dig for water), travelling with family for ceremonies, and maintaining a connection with the land.

“This is my country, my view of country.”

Natasha Beasley, Bush Medicine Plants (61 x 30 cm) POA

“Bush medicine plants are used for healing on the body and for drinking. We make this by smashing the plants with a rock, we use the juice and the fibre of the plant. We collect bush medicine plants when we are out hunting. Different kinds of plants grow during different seasons. There are lots of different medicines, we know what their stories are, we learnt them from our parents and we teach these stories to our
children.” Bush medicine knowledge is still strong in Ampilatwatja, it continues to be passed down to the younger generations and is widely used. When the women go hunting they often gather bush medicine. The plants depicted here are found in the country around Ampilatwatja, they are used for soothing skin infections and to make a drink to help with colds and coughs. Painting bush medicine stories is important because it helps to maintain a strong knowledge and culture for the community.

 

[Information used with kind permission of Artists of Ampilatwatja. Copyright of all artwork and text remains with the artists and Aboriginal traditional owners and is administered on their behalf by Artists of Ampilatwatja.]